About

Norwegian-Swedish film composer Christine Hals came from the snowy mountains and fjords of Norway to the beaches and bright boulevards of Los Angeles, CA after completing a Masters degree in Film Scoring at the highly acclaimed Dramatical Institute and the Royal College of Music in Stockholm. Back home, Christine scored for various short movies, features and documentaries, some of which have won several awards. Now she’s ready for even bigger challenges.

Weeks after graduating from a prestigious intensive one year course in music composition on scholarship at the University of Southern California, where Christine studied under the mentorship of A-list composer James Newton Howard, the young composer was head-hunted by Disney Studios. They needed Norwegian lyrics and vocals for a little film called Frozen, and Christine had the perfect artist background. As a young girl, she herded goats using a high-pitched singing style known as “kulning” to call the animals down from icy slopes. She also contributed lyrics in Ancient Norse to one of the songs. The filmmakers praised her work on Frozen which went on to become the top-grossing film of 2013 and win several Academy Awards including Best Animated Picture for directors Jennifer Lee and Chris Buck, and Best Song for songwriters Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Bobby Lopez.

Christine lives, works and plays in Santa Monica where she writes music for films, TV shows and computer games and also provides film vocals and pop vocals for fellow composers. Her background in fine art stands her in good stead when painting with sound for moving pictures. “I see music as colors and landscapes, but I think we all have different interpretations of it, so we see different colors and images. That’s why I love trying to figure out how directors want their films to be heard.  I simply love mixing my colors and musical landscapes with their visuals.”

Christine is inspired by the world around her, whether that be the sounds of big city LA or Stockholm, or the murmur of the sea. She holds in her heart memories of Norway’s Northern lights in dark winter, the bright summer midnight sun and the beauty of snow stretching for miles and miles.  Christine believes that creativity and your artistic side comes from your soul and your soul is touched by all the experiences you’ve had and all the people you’ve met, resulting in a music that reflects her travels as it explores different cultures, styles and musical imagery, bringing to life the newly-born characters of a filmmaker’s imagination.

 

Praise for Christine…

You’re very dedicated and true to your music. You have a very unique sound and an extraordinary voice. What a range!

Jean Michel Jarre – Jean Michel Jarre is one of Christine’s musical heroes.

 

I can’t tell you how much I loved the choral part – it was really good!” … “I think you’re doing really good work. You have really great instincts for film music, I think you’re gonna be very good!

James Newton Howard - Christine’s former mentor

 

Working with Christine is like directing the perfect actor. She asks great questions and understands what the scene is about and what music’s role in it is. Then she surprises you with what she creates, finding moments in the visuals that you never knew were there. She’s always receptive to notes and new approaches to the material. Her passion for the project, musical sensitivity, amazing vocal skills and professionalism make her a pleasure to work with from start to finish,” says writer/director Jean Barker.

 

Director and producer Abi Damaris Corbin: “Christine breathes life into every scene she scores. On each of our five collaborations, she’s found a true and unique way to musically write the subtext of the story. She’s used glass to create longing, a chime to depict inescapable sadness, and an mbira to help a young girl find courage to face the world on her own.  In addition to Christine’s wide musical range and ample story telling abilities, she is a joyful collaborator who is wholly dedicated to excellence and always delivers.

 

Photo by: Per Ottar Walderhaug

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